The Beguiled (Bluray review)

Director; Sofia Coppola
Drama/Thriller
1h 33 minutes
Out on Bluray.

Quite the disappointment to be honest, or maybe it was me who simply expected something completely different than what the trailer had me believing.
I wanted more thrill, more raw uncertainty on what would go down. It all felt pretty well predictable, I thought I’d be gasping for air, left in awe due to the shock, that I’d be spun around, but it was an hour and a half of dullness, thinking that something was about to happened but never did, the build-up was flat, and so was the story and plot.

However, the acting was what kept me going, I continued watching it toward the very end for the sole purpose that Kidman was phenomenal, a brilliant performance that had me admiring her entire being and character. There is an essence of elegance and peace around her, and that alone is enough to check this film out.

A wounded solider (Colin Farrell) arrives at girls school in Virginia, causing a havoc of the darkest in betrayal and jealousy.

Not something I’d strongly recommend to someone, but also not something to completely turn away from. If you have an hour and half to spare, it is a pretty decent film to kill time with, nothing more, nothing less. 5/10

Bluray extras;
A shift in perspective.
A southern style.

Copy from SONY.

Thank you ♡


Sony Home Entertainment Nordic, I adore you. I cannot express my gratitude enough for these copies that keeps on dropping in my mail for me to review. Thank you for the work and keeping my favorite occupation alive by letting me do what I love the most, combining stories, motion pictures, and writing. Reviews will be up soon as usual.

Måste Gitt (Review)

Director; Ivica Zubak
Comedy/Drama
1h 37 minutes
From 2017 – Out on Blueray.

Let us first begin this review with this, anyone who knows me very well is well aware that the last thing I’d probably ever watch, is a Swedish movie.
For years have I not been grasped by one, thrilled, or slightly moved, nor even entertained, to say the least.
I never found myself remotely fascinated by the production, vision, script, nothing ever caught my interest except for one, many years ago, Vingar Av Glas (Wings of glass) with Alexander Skarsgård.
It was the first time that I actually found myself enjoying a Swedish film, after that, it was simply American motion pictures that were my cup of tea.
My favorites include classics such as A ClockWork Orange by Stanley Kubrick (the man’s a genius), Goodfellas, Jane Eyre, Casablanca, A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints, and with time newer titles were created, and new ones made the list.

I never gave Swedish titles a chance, I stayed away from them… until now.
Thanks to Måste Gitt, I now have a new found admiration for not only Swedish films, but also Swedish production. I was surprised, and I’m not saying that in a negative way, I was pleased that besides enjoying the story and plot, I legitimately laughed, hard, several times throughout the movie.

Måste Gitt, vision wise was fantastic, the camera shots and flow from one scene to another was beautifully done, even better than Alpha Dog from 2006 by Nick Cassavetes, and ten times better than Fifty Shades of Grey and that says a lot due to 50 Shades having probably a much larger budget and being a Universal Studio production, yet they managed to slaughter the entire movie adaption.
Here, they worked brilliantly with what they had and made it so well, very Straight Outta Compton vibes meets 8 Mile (2002) with a touch of Menace II Society (1993) due to the drama and how life on the street goes down.
The script was intriguing and thrilling with a lot of depth, soul, and faith mixed with great humour, lightness, and wonderful acting by everyone involved. I’m not one to gush over Swedish titles, so this says a whole lot about this movie.

Metin, played by Can Demirtas is a suburb guy living in Stockholm. Though playing with fire due to his lifestyle on the street, he still aspires to be an actor and during his audition for theater school, he accidentally without knowing drops his journal in which one of the teachers/judges finds and sends it to a publisher.
Little do they know, that everything written in that diary is real life stories that he’s been part of and been through.
Can he publish it? A journal filled with crime, drama, and people from the underworld? It’s a struggle that will eat Metin from the inside out.

A gigantic bow to the entire cast and crew for this phenomenal film they delivered. 8.8/10

+ Can Demirtas is on a great path to become Sweden’s Ben Foster.
– Due to not giving away any spoilers, however, I didn’t enjoy the ending. I felt as they should’ve wrapped it up five minutes earlier before they actually did. They left it kind of open, maybe for a sequel, which I strongly hope they don’t.
The movie was so good but sequels barely, ever are.
Look at Taken, the first one was fantastic and the second and third was a mess. Step Up, the first one was great, and then it went downhill from there.

Anyways, strongly recommended, if you, like myself isn’t a fan of Swedish titles, this will change your entire outlook.



An epic thank you from the core of my being to the beautiful souls at Sony Home Entertainment Nordic, especially to Jesper Nordgren for the copy, looking forward to review the next title.
Xo, Beauty