Extremely wicked shockingly vile

Director; Joe Berlinger
Biography/Drama/Crime
1h 50 minutes
Out on Netflix.

Efron is brilliantly convincing as Ted Bundy, portraying someone who is a savage, manipulative and one expectational liar. From beginning to end, the movie truly captures your soul and never lets it go, grabs ahold of you entirely and you’re trapped under this spell of fantastic acting, great visual, and a gruesome story – one based on real events.

Personally, look wise they didn’t match at all – if you compare both Bundy and Efron. Based sole on Bundy’s description as a handsome man and a charming character that had it easy with the ladies, then I totally get casting Efron. And though the look wasn’t there, Efron made up with one exceptional performance among side one great ensemble.

The script is quite fast paced which is what I enjoyed the most, it doesn’t start off dull nor does it become it either – they get right to the point, and there wasn’t any unnecessary dragged out scenes, which made the movie a whole lot more enjoyable.
The visuals of the late ’70s were beautifully shown and so was the costumes, sets, and locations.

If you’ve heard the story you already know the plot, about a serial-killer who practically lived two lives – having everyone around him convinced he wasn’t this dark, twisted, and insane monster capable of the horrid things he was being accused of, though he later admitted to 30 murders and the youngest victim was only 12, Kimberly Leach.

It’s despicable, reading it and not being able to wrap your head around how someone can be this mentally ill, and then seeing it being played in front of you on the screen, yet, you can’t help but to watch and be fascinated at the same time how the brain of a psychopath is wired. Doing this on one side, and living as a loving husband and father on the other.

Overall, an entertaining movie for the interested one. 6/10